Does my AOL Mail account get deactivated if I don't use it for 90 days?

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Does my AOL Mail account get deactivated if I don't use it for 90 days?

Yes, an AOL Mail account does get deactivated after 90 days of disuse.

If you log in within 30 days after those 90 days have elapsed (i.e., within 120 days total from the last time you logged in), your account is reactivated and you won't notice any difference. Everything will be as it was the last time you opened your account, and you may continue using it as you normally would.

If you log in after the 90 days have elapsed, and after the 30-day grace period has elapsed, and find that your username and password still work (which is not guaranteed), your email account will be empty. Any saved data -- email, photos, attachments -- will be missing, because it will be deleted. For questions like, "Why do I see the welcome message in my AOL Mail account?", or "Where did my email go?", or "Why is my email missing?", this is the answer.

As stated in AOL's Terms Of Service, if a user doesn't log into their account for 90 days (i.e., if an account is unused or dormant for 90 days), it is deactivated:

"Your username and account may be terminated if you do not sign on a Service with your username at least once every 90 days. If you are registered for fee-based or term-specific Services, we will not terminate your username or account unless they are subject to being terminated for some other reason...

After we terminate or deactivate your account for inactivity, we have no obligation to retain, store, or provide you with any data, information, e-mail, or other content that you uploaded, stored, transferred, sent, mailed, received, forwarded, posted or otherwise provide to us (collectively "posted" or "post") on the Services and may allow another user to register and use the username. We also have no obligation to remove any public data, content, or other information that you posted on a Service or reactivate your account."

For the full details, take a look at AOL's complete Terms Of Service







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Last updated: 06-10-2014
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